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how long after adding chlorine can you test

Most hot tub owners know they have to add chlorine or other types of sanitizers to the water. But when you do and want to check the water again before you get in, how long after adding chlorine to your hot tub can you test?

Here’s what I have learned:

After adding chlorine sanitizer to a hot tub, wait for 30 minutes before testing the water again. Also, ensure that the chlorine level reaches 5 ppm or lower before using the tub. For chlorine shock, however, being more concentrated, it is ideal to wait at least overnight, if not 24 hours, before testing again.

That’s just the tip of the iceberg.

In this article, we’ll find out how long to wait after shocking your hot tub and after adding chemicals to it. But we’ll also explore how long to wait after adding bromine.

Let’s get started.

Ready to Spend Less Time On Maintenance and More Time Enjoying Your Hot Tub?

Let’s face it. Balancing the water, cleaning filters, dealing with rashes, and trying to figure out which chemicals to buy and add can make you feel more like a chemist than someone who just wants to relax after a long hard day!

That’s exactly why The Hot Tub Handbook and Video Course is so valuable!

This is from Matt over at Swim University and he developed it for people looking to save money, time, and frustration. His tips on chemicals can save you $100/year just by making sure you buy only what you need.

So if you’re ready to stop being confused or frustrated with your hot tub and start spending more time in it, check out The Hot Tub Handbook and Video Course.

Just click that link to learn more on their website.

Shocking the hot tub kind of day. pic.twitter.com/QellzY4mDI

— Keith “Bumpy” Munro (@kmunro2008) July 9, 2016

How long to wait after shocking the hot tub?

Ideally, wait for 24 hours after shocking the hot tub before testing the water or getting in. Hot tub shock is highly concentrated and more powerful than chlorine sanitizer and can be dangerous to soak in if the levels are too high.

Therefore, you want to ensure that it is safe before you and others use the hot tub.

How soon you can start using your hot tub is really a function of the type and quantity of shock used. The purpose is to improve water clarity and quality.

There are two types: chlorine-based and non-chlorine shock.

The former, sodium dichlor, shocks the water as well as restores sanitizer levels, while the latter only oxidizes the water.

If the latter is what you applied to the water, you can test the water after 30 minutes to know if it’s safe to use the hot tub.

But because the former is chlorine-based, you want to wait for 24 hours before testing and using the hot tub. Keep the lid off and ensure that the jets are running when you apply sanitizers and shock.

What about bromine?

How soon after can you use the tub, and how does bromine differ from chlorine in terms of wait times?

This is the theme of a recent article where I explored whether you could get into a hot tub faster if you used bromine instead of chlorine. I also discussed safe levels for chlorine and bromine. But there’s 1 concern some hot tub owners have about bromine.

Just click the link to read it on my site.

Tuesday Tips — When heating or adding chemicals to your hot tub, be sure to turn off the air valves. This will allow the hot tub to heat up quickly and the chemicals will mix with the water faster.#westrockpools #hottub #spa #tuesdaytips #hottubmaintenance pic.twitter.com/In3FyaDnqv

— Westrock Pool & Spa (@Westrockpools50) January 23, 2018

How long after adding chemicals to a hot tub can you go in?

As a general rule, wait at least 30 minutes after adding chemicals to a hot tub before getting in. But when adjusting pH or alkalinity, 20 minutes is sufficient, whereas 24 hours is recommended for chlorine shock.

But it’s best to always test before you go in.

In addition to the sanitizers, you also want to test the water’s alkalinity and pH. There’s a range you want to meet, otherwise, the water could be unhealthy for you.

And of course, for chlorine or bromine sanitizer, how long you should wait really depends on how much you add. That’s why I prefer a floater with tablets. I add 6 tablets about once a week, and then my hot tub is always ready for me at the perfect levels.

Want to see all my recommendations for floaters and chemicals?

Check out this page on my website with convenient links to Amazon. It’s literally everything I use for my hot tub. Both chemicals are effective and safe, but they differ in their reactive rate and cost. They rid your hot tub of bacteria and contaminants. But bromine is more expensive than chlorine.

Chlorine is less stable in warm temperatures.

This is why it’s used more often in pools than in hot tubs. Because it’s not as stable as bromine, it has to be applied more frequently. And it’s not particularly mild if you have sensitive skin.

Another vital consideration is balancing your pH and alkalinity levels. When you employ test strips or liquid kit tests, they’ll indicate how basic or acidic the water is. pH is a scale of 0 to 14.

A pH below 7 is acid, 7 is neutral, and above 7 is alkaline. Ideally, pH levels in your hot tub should be between 7.4 and 7.6 if you use chlorine and 7.0 and 7.4 if you use bromine.

A measurement outside this range is indicative of serious water problems.

The lower the pH, the more acidic your hot tub water is. This makes it difficult for the sanitizers to work effectively! If water is too acidic, it can gradually destroy the tub’s working parts, in addition to triggering skin and eye irritation.

If the water’s alkalinity is high, it can trigger green water because it also reduces the effectiveness of the sanitizers. To lower its alkalinity, add a pH decreaser or soda ash (sodium bisulfate). Alkalinity measures the water’s capacity to resist a change in pH. It protects against acids.

By the way, what’s the difference between chlorine and bromine?

That’s what I explored in a recent article. In it, I explained what these two chemicals are and whether bromine is more or less effective than chlorine. But I also revealed which is better.

Just click the link to read it on my site.

For a hot tub, bromine is used to keep it clean rather than chlorine. This is because bromine is able to handle the higher temperatures better! pic.twitter.com/GUqjgxgomH

— AAA Repair & Service (@repair_aaa) November 30, 2018

How long to wait after adding bromine to a hot tub?

It is recommended to wait for at least 30 minutes after adding bromine power or liquid to hot tub before getting in or re-testing the water.

The water should always be tested to ensure that the bromine level is right before using the hot tub.

Bromine does take longer to dissipate than chlorine, but it is not as irritating to the eyes. But your water may be cloudier after you’ve used bromine compared to chlorine.

Say you tested the water and discovered the bromine level is too high, do you still go ahead and soak in the tub? No, you’ve got to wait, and depending on the quantity you applied, you may have to wait for a few hours.

Until the test shows that the bromine level is okay, resist the temptation to disregard the test result. This leads us to an interesting and logical question: can you get in if the test strip is good?

If you use bromine, can you use a chlorine-based shock?

Check out a recent article where I explained the difference between shock and sanitizer and the difference between chlorine and non-chlorine shock. But I also spoke about whether there’s a need to shock a bromine spa.

Just click the link to read it on my site.

When checking for your hot tub’s pH levels, make sure to align the test strip with the correct color guide and take an accurate color read. Next, apply the water treatment chemicals and done! pic.twitter.com/tfrHctEDh7

— Sunniland Patio (@sunnilandpatio) July 11, 2018

If the hot tub test strip is good, can I get in?

As long as it’s been at least 30 minutes since adding chemicals, if the test strip is good for sanitizer, pH, and alkalinity, it is safe to get in the hot tub.

But you also want to check visually, for foam, for example.

And ensure the tub’s filtration system is in good order. The vital thing is to ensure that you follow the instruction on how to use the test strip correctly. Check to see that you’re not, in fact, using a strip that has expired.

If you’re interested in unerring accuracy, you may want to explore a titration kit or a digital strip reader. The latter has grown popular in recent times because of ease of use, cost, and accuracy.

Suppose your tub has high chlorine, is it safe to use it?

In a recent article, I explained what happens if chlorine is too high in a hot tub and how to lower the chlorine level in your hot tub. But I also explained whether high chlorine levels could hurt you.

Just click the link to read it on my site.

Bromine dispenser and hot tub coaster … yep. #meatapalooza pic.twitter.com/NX2pFSFVAV

— Brad Galland (@bradgalland) August 17, 2013

Is it better to use a floater for chlorine in a hot tub?

A floater is a better way to disperse chlorine (or bromine) sanitizer into a hot tub’s water without requiring daily maintenance. Simply add 4-6 chlorine or bromine tablets about once a week.

I love my floater, although I was once resistant to it.

I was hesitant at first as I didn’t like the idea of it bobbing into me continuously if the jets were on. But the solution is to simply set it on the rim of the hot tub while you soak. Then just toss it back in when you’re ready to get out.

So which floater and tablets do I recommend?

CLICK HERE to check out my favorite hot tub floater on Amazon by Hydrotools. It’s easy to fill and replace, and it supports both chlorine and bromine tablets.

You can easily rotate it to adjust the flow rate to your liking. It’s small, so it does its work without being a distraction.

Now, let’s check out the tablets. CLICK HERE to check out Clorox chlorinating tablets on Amazon.

It keeps your water clean and is effective in killing bacteria and preventing algae. It is made in a manner that protects it from the harsh effects of sunlight and can be used in small and large hot tubs.

It’s got almost 8,000 ratings on Amazon, and almost all are 5-stars.

Prefer bromine as I do? In that case, CLICK HERE to get Leisure Time bromine tablets from Amazon. It’s more expensive than chlorine but lasts longer, so you’ll find you need fewer tablets to do the same amount of work.

Conclusion

In the article, we found out how long to wait after shocking your hot tub and after adding chemicals to it.

But we also explored how long to wait after adding bromine. Then, we looked at if it’s okay to get into a hot tub as long as the test is good.

Lastly, we wrapped things up by considering if it’s better to use a floater to dispense chlorine.

Ready to Spend Less Time On Maintenance and More Time Enjoying Your Hot Tub?

Let’s face it. Balancing the water, cleaning filters, dealing with rashes, and trying to figure out which chemicals to buy and add can make you feel more like a chemist than someone who just wants to relax after a long hard day!

That’s exactly why The Hot Tub Handbook and Video Course is so valuable!

This is from Matt over at Swim University and he developed it for people looking to save money, time, and frustration. His tips on chemicals can save you $100/year just by making sure you buy only what you need.

So if you’re ready to stop being confused or frustrated with your hot tub and start spending more time in it, check out The Hot Tub Handbook and Video Course.

Just click that link to learn more on their website.