Andersen Windows Costs

Andersen Windows Costs

All Andersen window series can be purchased for DIY installation.

A few Andersen 100 Series, 200 Series and 400 Series windows are available “off the shelf” or online from local home improvement stores, and those costs for individual windows are easily found.

Just keep in mind that the windows you find in stock at Home Depot, for example, give you few options for style, size, color, and accessories. As a result, they are on the low end of the cost spectrum compared with windows in those series with upgraded options.

The popular Renewal by Andersen replacement windows are the exception. Renewal windows are only sold by local dealers in a package that includes the windows plus installation.

OK, with that introduction out of the way, let’s look at Andersen windows prices for each series along with your choices for styles, finishes, colors, and options for each. Pros and cons for each series are discussed with the goal to help you decide which series is right for your home.

Andersen Window Prices

This Andersen windows price list includes the cost of the windows plus professional installation. See the Installation Cost section below for potential savings by installing them yourself.

SeriesMaterialTotal RangeFixedDouble-hungCasement
36″W x 48″H36″W x 48″H36″W x 48″H
100 SeriesAll Fibrex$690 – $2,400$965 – $1,250N/A$1,365 – $2,100
200 SeriesWood/Vinyl$535 – $2,900$645 – $1,400$760 – $1,800$935 – $2,160
400 SeriesWood/Vinyl$570 – $3,600$770 – $1,485$865 – $1,885$975 – $2,215
RenewalWood/Fibrex$825 – $4,250$935 – $1,465$1,090 – $1,890$1,200 – $2,250
A SeriesWood/Fibrex$940 – $5,000$1,100 – $1,590$1,215 – $2,130$1,385 – $2,300
E SeriesWood/Aluminum$985 – $5,600$1,015 – $1,675$1,135 – $2,345$1,315 – $2,485

The smallest window sizes considered for this price list are 24” x 24”. The maximum window sizes considered are 48” x 72”. Windows are priced with dual pane, low-E glass. Enhanced low-E glass and triple pane glass are optional selections on most window series at an increased cost of $55 to $215 per window.

Pro Installation Cost

How much is pro installation? Or what can you save by DIY? $300 to $600 per window for most windows. Gliding and hinged doors cost $375 to $800 to install while bay and bow window assemblies range from $750 to $1,500 in labor costs.

What is Fibrex?

Fibrex is Andersen’s proprietary composite material. The 100 Series are all Fibrex. The A Series and Renewal by Andersen have wood interiors and Fibrex exteriors.

According to Andersen Windows, Fibrex is “a blend of 40 percent wood fiber by weight, mostly reclaimed from Andersen manufacturing processes, with 60 percent thermoplastic polymer by weight…”

The blend of reclaimed wood and plastic is why Fibrex is called a composite. It is unique to the industry, though in terms of strength, insulation value and durability, the Pella Impervia and Milgard Ultra fiberglass frames are comparable.

Fibrex vs Vinyl

Vinyl is the most popular window material used today with more than 75% of the market. Andersen is one of the few brands that doesn’t make a vinyl window. Pella, Ply Gem, Simonton, Milgard, Jeld-Wen, etc. all make several lines at least in vinyl.

Andersen claims that Fibrex is two times stronger than vinyl. While this is likely to be true based on Andersen’s testing methods, it is not a reason to avoid vinyl windows. Vinyl frames are strong enough for most window installations.

Why doesn’t Andersen make vinyl windows? Probably because vinyl doesn’t fit Andersen’s reputation. And, to make it easier to avoid vinyl, the company has plenty of scrap wood material to blend with plastic polymers, which are inexpensive, to create Fibrex, a unique window material, and that’s great for marketing.

Typical Average Installed Cost per Window

The ranges in the table above are quite wide based on the options offered. This is especially true for Andersen wood windows in the A Series and E Series that are manufactured in wood species like walnut, cherry and alder that cost more than pine.

The series also offers more customization, which raises the price tag. If you choose a window in a wood other than pine, with factory stain if available on that window and premium hardware, cost will be 50% to 100% more than an unfinished wood frame window of the same series, size, and style.

So, what’s the average cost of Andersen windows in the most popular style and sizes? That’s what is covered here – Andersen window prices for 36” (W) x 48” (H) double-hung windows in all lines except the 100 Series since that style isn’t produced in the series. Instead, the price is for 100 Series single-hung windows.

Wood windows are pine windows with standard dual pane, low-E glass, and clad exteriors. The 200 and 400 Series have vinyl clad exteriors. The E Series features aluminum cladding on the exterior.

Again, all windows are priced at the 36” wide x 48” high size.

SeriesWindow TypeAverage Installed Cost
100 SeriesSingle-hung$1,175
200 SeriesDouble-hung$1,225
400 SeriesDouble-hung$1,415
RenewalDouble-hung$1,585
A SeriesDouble-hung$1,780
E SeriesDouble-hung$1,925

Cost Factors

Each window series offers a range of styles and options that affect the total cost of the window.

Material – Andersen windows are manufactured in wood and Fibrex composite. Windows with a Fibrex frame cost more than Andersen 200 windows and 400 Series windows with a pine frame.

But the cost of the 400 Series is higher when you start to price windows with frames constructed of other wood species.

A rough cost comparison on materials looks like this:

All Pine with vinyl clad exteriors – 200 Series ($$)

All Fibrex – 100 Series ($$$-$$$$)

All Wood in multiple species options with vinyl clad exteriors – 400 Series ($$-$$$)

Wood interiors in multiple species options with Fibrex composite exteriors – A Series and Renewal by Andersen ($$$-$$$$$)

Wood interiors in multiple species options with aluminum clad exteriors – E Series ($$$-$$$$$)

Window Size – It goes without saying that the larger the window, when the material and options are the same, the higher the cost. It’s not surprising that a 36”x48” window that is 12 square feet and has 14 linear feet of frame costs a lot more than a 24”x36” window in the same series that is 6 square feet with 10 feet of frame.

Options, Upgrades and Customization – Your choices are limited in the 100, 200 and, to some extent, the 400 Series. But the A Series, E Series and Renewal by Andersen offer more choices that come with a higher cost – especially the full customization choices of the Andersen E Series.

Andersen Window Series Reviews, Pros, Cons and Options

This section is a deeper dive into the six Andersen windows series. They are the 100, 200, 400, A and E Series windows plus Renewal by Andersen.

Andersen 100 Series

These Andersen Fibrex windows are tough and durable with the appearance of painted wood windows.

Pros and Cons: The 100 Series Fibrex windows are stronger than vinyl, which is a minor advantage since vinyl is quite tough, but they cost more. In our opinion, they offer less value than a quality vinyl window. There is no double-hung window in this line. Color choices are limited.

Cost Range: $690 to $2,400 installed. A few entry level single-hung 100 Series windows are sold by building supply companies starting below $350.

Styles: Single-hung, awning, casement, gliding, picture, and specialty shapes. Gliding patio doors, aka sliding glass doors, are available too.

Colors: Your interior/exterior color selection is better than some vinyl windows offer, with 4 interior choices and 5 exterior options. White can be matched with any exterior color, but the other colors such as dark bronze and black can only be matched with white or with the same color inside and outside.

Hardware: Six finishes in colored vinyl coatings plus higher-cost Satin Nickel and Antique Brass.

Glass Options: Basic low-E glass is standard. You can upgrade to one of 4 glass options suited to specific climates. Clear, dual pane glass is a cheaper choice than low-E, but it isn’t energy efficient and not recommended for most homes.

Other Options: All glass types can be chosen in patterned glass – obscured for privacy. You have the choice of standard fiberglass mesh screens and Andersen TrusScene screens with micro-fine stainless steel that is 50% less visible with 25% less restriction of airflow.

Andersen 200 Series

These vinyl-clad wood windows are the most affordable Andersen windows. You’ll find a limited selection of them on the shelf in home improvement stores for DIY or pro installation, but most of them are sold through local Andersen window dealers.

Pros and Cons: They offer good value in a wood window. The exteriors are clad in vinyl for improved protection against the elements and lower maintenance requirements. You don’t have a lot of style and color selection with Andersen 200 windows, however.

Cost Range: $535 – $2,900 for installed windows. Prices start around $250 for small 200 Series windows at Home Depot and other building supply retailers.

Styles: Double-hung, gliding, casement.

Colors: Interior choices are unfinished pine and pine painted white. Exterior colors are white and Sandtone, a tan color.

Hardware: Seven total – 4 standard and 3 premium colors including Bright Brass and Satin Nickel.

Glass Options: Basic low-E glass and the same 4 options as the 100 Series windows.

Other Options: An opening control device for double-hung windows can be ordered for installation at the factory or once the windows have been installed. It prevents the window from opening more than 4 inches when activated.

Grilles can be installed between the glass for true divided light or over the glass for simulated divided light. Interior grilles only, which can be removed for cleaning the window are an option.  Five grille patterns are available.

Andersen 400 Series

This is Andersen’s best-selling series of windows. You’ll find a decent range in stock at building supply stores, but your best selection is offered by Andersen dealers. The standard 400 Series is a vinyl clad wood window.

The 400 Series Woodwright double-hung windows come in full-frame construction plus insert windows built for window replacement. They are unique in the 400 Series in that the interior is wood while the exterior is Fibrex.

Most Woodwright windows are used in historic renovations where the look of exterior wood is preferred to cladding.

Pros and Cons: The 400 series gives you the widest choice of styles except for the premium E Series. Cost is higher than prices for the 200 Series.

Cost Range: Installed prices are $570 to $3,600, except for bay and bow windows, which can be higher depending on the size of the assemblies and how many windows are used. Pre-made windows from retailers start at around $415.

Styles: Double-hung, casement, awning, gliding, fixed/picture and bay and bow windows.

Colors: Most 400 Series windows have pine interiors, but they can also be ordered in maple or oak. Interiors can be left unfinished or painted white, black or dark bronze.

Exteriors on standard 400 windows come in 7 colors of vinyl cladding. As noted, 400 Series Woodwright windows have Fibrex composite exteriors.

Hardware: Two keeper styles, standard and Estate premium hardware, are available plus 6 lift styles. Each is offered in 4 colors.

Glass Options: Seven glazing options include non-coated dual pane glass, standard Low-E4 glass and 5 additional choices that benefit homes in various climates.

For example, SmartSun glass filters 95% of UV rays and is ideal for sunny regions, especially on windows facing south and west. In cold climates, HeatLock interior coating can be added to reduce heat transfer from inside to outside.

Other Options: Seven grille patterns are offered, but if you have something unique in mind, Andersen can produce grilles from your design. Grilles are optional.

Renewal by Andersen

These are top-selling Andersen replacement windows. They are only sold through local franchises in a package with installation.

Pros and Cons: The ratings are high for Renewal windows, and they give you a pretty good selection of materials, colors, and other accessories. Cost, however, is higher than 400 Series windows, especially when premium options are ordered.

Cost Range: $1,500 to $4,250.

Styles: Double-hung, casement, awning, gliding/sliding, fixed/picture, bay, and bow. Matching patio sliding glass doors are manufactured in the Renewal Series.

Colors: Interiors are manufactured in your choice of pine, oak, or maple. Pine can be unfinished or painted in one of 6 colors ranging from white to black. Exterior composite Fibrex comes in 9 colors.

Hardware: Choose from 3 standard colors of coatings and 8 premium metallic finishes.

Glass Options: Standard low-E glass, high-performance Low-E4 and Low-E4 SmartSun glass that slows heat transfer are your choices. Glass can also be ordered in several obscured patterns for privacy.

Other Options: Choose grilles in one of three styles: For between the glass or on the interior or exterior of the windows. Or skip grilles if you prefer. Standard fiberglass mesh screens and TruScene screens with pine, oak or maple veneer frames are your choices.

Andersen A Series

Also called the Andersen A-Series windows, these premium windows feature wood interiors in various species and Fibrex composite exteriors in a decent range of colors. The series includes matching patio gliding doors.

Pros and Cons: You have a lot of options to consider for customizing your windows. Fibrex exteriors look like painted wood but without the maintenance hassles. These are beautiful windows at designer prices. But you don’t have as many style choices as the E-Series gives you.

Cost Range: $940 to $5,000.

Styles: Double-hung, casement, awning and picture/fixed. There are no bay or bow windows in the A Series, though 400 Series and E Series bays and bows work well with this series.

Colors: Interior frame wood species choices are pine, maple, oak, cherry, mahogany, and Douglas fir. All species can be selected unfinished or clear coated. Pine, maple, and oak can be stained in your choice of 5 tones. Pine and maple can also be painted in one of 7 colors.

Fibrex composite exteriors are manufactured in 11 colors.

Hardware: 9 colors including premium metallic finishes are offered.

Glass Options: Seven options start with standard Low-E glass. Five climate-specific glass choices allow you to choose the best option for energy efficiency. Triple-pane low-E glass is also available at a significantly higher price.

Other Options: Hardware comes in several styles. And an opening control device can be added for security after the windows are installed. It allows double-hung windows to open a maximum of 4 inches.

Grille choices include full and simulated divided light, including between-the-glass grilles, and removable interior grilles. Seven standard grille patterns are produced – and you can design your own grilles too.

Andersen E Series

Andersen’s most customizable window is also one of the most expensive windows made today. These are aluminum-clad wood windows in a large range of styles and options.

Pros and Cons: Full customization of each window style gives you nearly unlimited options. This includes 10 wood species plus the option to choose a custom species not on the standard list of choices.

Few homeowners do that, of course, but it’s an interesting possibility. The E-Series is produced in more styles than any other Andersen series. And it is the only Andersen window series that offers between-glass blinds and shades.

The downside to all this is the significantly higher cost. However, Andersen E-Series windows are comparably priced to other premium wood windows like Pella Reserve, Jeld-Wen Custom Wood, and Harvey Majestic wood windows.

Cost Range: $965 to $5,600

Styles: Double-hung, French (double) casement, push-out casement, awning, push-out awning, gliding, picture/shapes, bay, and bow.

Colors: The windows can be manufactured in 10 wood species plus a custom species you select. Choose unfinished, clear-coated or one of 8 standard factory stain finishes. Custom stain colors can be developed too. About 15 interior paint colors are offered plus custom colors.

Aluminum exterior cladding is manufactured in 50 standard colors and 7 anodized finishes. Or a custom color can be matched if you choose. You can select up to 4 colors for the various parts of the exterior – the sash, frame, trim, and grilles.

Hardware: Select from 10 finishes.

Glass Options: Same as the A Series windows.

Other Options: Full and simulated divided light, including between-the-glass grilles, and removable interior grilles are produced. The grilles are available in multiple profiles, widths and colors.

Standard, better-visibility TruScene, hinged and retractable screens are among the accessories. You can select wood veneer frames for your screens.

Several hardware styles in 10 finish choices are produced.

New Construction vs Replacement Windows

This topic is covered in depth on our Pella Window Prices guide, so here are the main points.

Windows are designed differently for each application.

New construction windows are fastened to the exterior sheathing of your home, so they must be installed before siding is added – either during construction or when you’re doing a complete exterior renovation.

To facilitate installation, new construction windows have a nailing fin or flange around the perimeter.

All Andersen windows except Renewal can be ordered for new construction installation.

Replacement windows are manufactured in full frame and insert or pocket window options. Full frame replacement windows are installed when the entire old window has been removed. It is fastened to the sides, top and bottom of the opening, so the home’s siding isn’t disturbed.

Pocket, aka insert, replacement windows are installed when just the sashes of an old single-hung or double-hung window are removed. The insert is attached to and through the old window frame.

Andersen insert windows are part of the 400 Series double-hung and Woodwright double-hung, 100 Series single-hung and E Series double-hung windows.

Upgrades and Their Costs

The chart shows the upgrades offered on each series of windows. A price list follows.

UpgradeSeries Available
Non-pine Wood Choices400 Woodwright (+3), A Series (+5), E (+9), Renewal (+2)
Aluminum CladdingE only
Primed/Painted Interiors200, 400, A, E, Renewal
Stained InteriorsA, E
Custom ColorsE only
Stormwatch Reinforced400, A, E
Hardware FinishAll
Upgraded Glass Coatings100 (+5), 200 (+4), 400 (+6), A (+6), E (+6), Renewal (+4)
Triple Pane GlassA, E, Renewal
Between-glass BlindsE only
Integrated Security Sensors200, 400, A, E
Bay & Bow Windows400, E, Renewal
Gliding Patio DoorsAll
Hinged Patio Doors200, 400, A, E, Renewal

Non-pine Wood Choices: $75 – $500+ per window. Douglas fir is the most affordable wood upgrade. Maple, oak, and hickory are midrange increases. Species like alder, cherry and mahogany are the most expensive. Not all additional species are available in each series.

Aluminum Cladding: $25 – $135 per window. Aluminum cladding is standard on E-Series exteriors, so putting a specific price on it is difficult. However, the $25-$135 range is what you’ll pay extra for an E-Series vs A-Series window when all else is equal.

Primed or Painted Wood Interior: $65 – $175 per window more than unfinished interiors.

Stained Wood Interior: $250 – $385 per window more than unfinished interiors.

Custom Colors: $30 – $85 per window. If you pick a custom color, expect your per window cost to increase significantly. Factors are home many windows you order and their size.

Stormwatch Reinforced: $125 – $450 based on window type and size. Stormwatch is offered on double-hung, casement and awning windows in the 400, A and E Series of Andersen windows. The frames are reinforced by aluminum stiffener bars and “frame snuggers.” Additional fasteners are used in cranks and hinges, and all glass is impact resistant.

Hardware Finish: $50 – $80 per window depending on specific hardware such as a lock, crank, lift or handle. Rather than being coated steel, these finishes are metallic and come in a range of options like antique brass, oil-rubbed bronze, brushed nickel, and chrome.

Upgraded Glass Coatings: $55 – $130 per window based on window size and the specific coating used. Ask your window dealer about the best coating for your climate and the direction the windows face.

Triple Pane Glass: $130 – $215 based on window size. Triple pane glass offers better energy efficiency and sound reduction.

Between-glass Blinds: $250 – $475 based on type and size.

Security Sensors: $35 – $70 per window. VeriLock sensors detect whether a window is opened or closed and whether it is locked. This is a security issue, of course, but it also allows you to lock unlocked windows for a tighter, more energy efficient fit. These sensors work with most smart home systems.

Bay & Bow Windows: $4,500 – $10,000+ each. Bay and bow windows are assemblies of windows joined together before or during installation. Cost is determined by the window series and the number and size of the windows used.

Gliding Patio Doors: $3,200 – $7,500+. Window series and door size and options determine cost.

Hinged Patio Doors: $3,400 – $8,100+. Again, window series and door size and options determine cost.

FAQs

Can I install my Andersen windows?

Yes, except for Renewal by Andersen, which are only sold in a package that includes installation.

Should you install your own windows? That’s a decision best left to you. Getting windows put in correctly is essential to their energy efficiency / weather-tightness and durability.

What is the return on investment for Andersen windows?

Higher than for most brands because Andersen has a solid reputation.

But it also varies by the Andersen series and what type of upgrades you choose. Generally, the higher the cost per window, the lower the ROI.

The highly regarded Cost to Value Report from Remodeling Magazine puts the return on investment, or the cost to value, of wood window replacement at 66.3% nationally. That means if you spend $25,000 on Andersen windows, your home’s value will theoretically increase by $25K x .663 or $16,675.

So, are Andersen windows worth the premium cost?

To be fair to Andersen, 200 Series and 400 Series windows are midrange in cost compared with other decent-quality wood windows from Pella, Marvin, Jeld-Wen, etc.

A-Series and E-Series are comparable to Pella Architect and Reserve plus other premium brands.

OK… here are a few tips that will help make your window choice “worth the money.”

  1. If you choose high-end upgrades like cherry or mahogany frames rather than pine or even oak, your ROI will suffer. Buy hey, they are your windows, and if you find one of those woods particularly good looking, then don’t hesitate to “take it home.”
  2. If stained interior wood is standard in your neighborhood, and you opt for a painted interior, buyers might not like it, and again, ROI will be lower. To maximize your return, choose windows that fit with the norms or your neighborhood with midrange upgrades and accessories.
  3. If wood is standard in homes like yours, then go with wood. You will get a much better return than if you opt for vinyl windows – or Andersen 100 Series with Fibrex interiors.

A Fibrex exterior like the E-Series and Renewal windows is fine and might even be preferred by some potential buyers because it looks like painted wood, not vinyl or aluminum and is low-maintenance and weatherproof.

Cost to value differs across the county. While 66.3% is the national average, the ROI is 75% in the Northwest and 69% on the East Coast but only around 60% in the Southeast and South-Central US where heavy rain, high humidity and the frequent tropical storms make homeowners cautious about wood windows even when they feature clad exteriors.

What’s better, full-frame or insert replacement windows?

If the existing frames are square and solid – no rot – then you will save money with insert windows, also called pocket windows. Our recommendation is to ask a pro to inspect your current windows to determine which is a better fit for your home.

Is Fibrex better than fiberglass?

They’re pretty similar in strength and appearance. Both are stronger than vinyl, but as we said above, that’s no reason to reject vinyl windows as an option.

Andersen Fibrex vs Pella Impervia is a common comparison.

Pella claims that, “Pella’s proprietary fiberglass material has displayed superior strength over wood, vinyl, aluminum, wood/plastic composites, and other fiberglass materials used by leading national brands…in accordance with ASTM D638 and D790 testing standards.”

“Wood/plastic composites” would include Fibrex. However, in our experience, both materials are very strong and won’t warp, crack, or otherwise fail under most conditions.

Make your Fibrex vs fiberglass decision based on the window style and price that best suits you.

Are tax credits or energy rebates available on Andersen windows?

There are no longer any federal tax credits for energy efficient windows and doors. However, most energy companies do offer rebates. The rebates range from $15 to $30 per window, which isn’t a whole lot compared to the investment you’re considering.

When should I replace my windows?

Are they in poor shape? Drafty? Is the glass fogged up? Are cranks broken? Do casement sashes sag? Is there wood rot?

Those are all indications that new windows should be considered.

Should I replace all the windows at once?

This is preferred if it’s in the budget. You’ll have windows of the same age that came out of the same factory, so they will be more uniform in appearance. And you might get a better price per window based on ordering a larger number, especially with a little friendly negotiation.

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