pee in hot tub

You might think it’s OK to pee in your inflatable hot tub. Just this once. After all, whose going to know? And surely the chemicals in the water are going to get rid of it, aren’t they?

Well no. Not only is it gross to pee in your inflatable spa, it can actually be very dangerous. So please read on to find out why you mustn’t pee in your inflatable hot tub, my friend.

Why You Really Really Shouldn’t Pee In Your Hot Tub

Everybody knows you mustn’t do it, but still so many of us do. However there are several important reasons why you shouldn’t ever use your inflatable hot tub as a toilet!

It’s Inconsiderate

Whether it’s your inflatable hot tub or a friend’s, as you’ll read in a moment peeing in a hot tub means that someone is going to have to spend a lot of time cleaning the hot tub to get rid of the pee you leave behind.

So when you have that secret tinkle, you’re creating unnecessary work. Sometimes, a lot of work!

It Can be Dangerous

While you may think peeing in the hot tub is harmless, it can actually be hazardous to both you and other hot tub users alike.

That’s all due to one of the main chemicals found in pee, called urea, This is a nitrogen-containing substance. It’s colorless and odorless, and it’s highly soluble in water. On its own, it’s pretty much non-toxic. In fact, when you add it to water, it is neither acidic nor alkaline.

However! When you combine it with chlorine – remember that chlorine is the sanitizer used in most inflatable hot tubs tubs – the chlorine breaks down the urea. A new chemical by-product is then formed called chloramine.

The Dangers of Chloramine

Now chloramine can be harmful if it comes into contact with skin in the water. In the majority of cases, the symptoms of exposure to chloramine are mild but still worrying! They including irritated and red skin, as well as burning and itchy eyes. And if you have a skin condition, then exposure can make your condition much worse.

More seriously, if you inhale chloramine by breathing in the steam off your inflatable hot tub, it can cause respiratory problems such as coughing, wheezing, and sore throats. It can even cause asthma.

You may or may not know this, but many competitive swimmers suffer from asthma. And a recent survey found that every competitive swimmer confesses to peeing in the swimming pool on a regular basis! And, as you’re aware, swimming pools contain a lot of chlorine. So now you know why so many of these swimmers have asthmatic attacks.

We don’t want to keep on worrying you, but another health hazard is that if you breathe in chloramine on a regular basis, it can increase sensitivity to different forms of bacteria and fungi. These can lead to some very scary illnesses indeed, such as Legionnaires Disease.

So the next time you think that one secret little pee won’t do any harm, think again!

An Ounce Of Prevention

As with many things in life, prevention is better than any cure. There are two relatively simple ways to prevent people peeing in your spa.

Establish Clear Rules

Make sure that everyone who uses your inflatable hot tub knows they must not pee in the water. Explain to them what happens and what health hazards one simple tinkle can cause.

If you have children who are going to use your hot tub, it’s vital that you explain carefully to them why they must never pee in the water. Stress that they must go to the bathroom before they get into the hot tub.

One useful way to reinforce this rule is to get the children to come up with and design a set of Inflatable Hot Tub Rules which you display near the hot tub. Having them do this helps them remember the rules – and stick to them.

If you’re unsure about any area of children using your inflatable hot tub, we have an important guide which we think everyone who owns an inflatable hot tub should read: How To Keep Children Safe In Your Inflatable Hot Tub.

Shower Before You Get In

Not to be too graphic, but there can be traces of urea on your body – even the cleanest person will most likely have a trace. That’s because apart from the obvious area, urea is also found in sweat. So if you have sweated at all during the day, then there will be some urea left on your skin. This will quickly wash off in the water.

Therefore, before you and any other hot tub user gets into the spa, it’s imperative to take a shower. Don’t let anyone think just quickly dipping their head under the spray is enough! Make sure they have a good, all-over shower (with no soap or shower gel) before they use the hot tub.

Showering also removes any shampoo residue, perfume, lotions, and oils on your skin that would also pollute the hot tub water. So showering is a win-win benefit all round, in terms of keeping your hot tub water fresh and clean for longer.

What To Do If Someone Pees In Your Hot Tub

If you believe that someone has peed in your inflatable hot tub, I’m afraid you’re going to have to spend a fair while putting it right. This is to get rid of the urea and to make sure the hot tub is safe for you and any other hot tub users.

Shock the Hot Tub

If you suspect there is pee in the water, you are going to have to shock the water in order to oxidize the urine and remove it from the hot tub. Remember, when you shock your hot tub, you will need to wait until the chlorine levels drop before you can use it again.

If you are unsure about how to shock your hot tub, we have a step-by-step guide written in easy-to-understand language: How To Shock Your Inflatable Hot Tub (opens in a new tab).

Drain the Hot Tub

If you find that the water still smells unusually strong of chlorine after you shock the hot tub, then it’s highly likely some traces of urea remain on the vinyl surface of the hot tub.

In that case, there’s nothing else you can do except completely drain your hot tub and clean it thoroughly.

You’ll have to remove all of the contaminated water from the tub, and then when it’s empty give the sides of the hot tub a good cleaning. This will take time – and, to be honest, is a pain in the you-know-where. But you really must remove all traces of urea from the hot tub.

Conclusion

So as you can see, peeing in an inflatable hot tub is not an innocent act at all. It can cause some serious health risks. It will also create a lot of work, and take you a lot of time to restore your hot tub to its pre-pee state.

We sincerely hope this is something you never have to deal with! Thanks for reading.

Photo of author

Author S Krone

A lawyer never retires. So I would just say that I am not as active as I used to be. Now I simply dedicate myself to fishing, my hobby, and my grandchildren. For Business Finance News I write about legal aspects of mortgage policies, mostly regarding the rights of policyholders. I also have articles about personal injuries.

Thank you for visiting businessfinancenews.com

Leave a Comment

Business Finance

About Us

Business Finance News is a brand oriented to business owners and dedicated to analyzing and comparing the cost and conditions of B2B procurement of goods and services through free quotes delivered by business partners.

Contact

Address 5050 Quorum Drive, (75254) Dallas TX

telephone 844-368-6072

DISCLAIMER

A personal loan is a medium term loan with a fixed interest rate that is repaid in equal monthly payments and it's usually limited to 24 months. Loan offers and eligibility depend on your individual credit profile. Our lenders can help you obtain as much as $3,000 depending on the lender, your state and your financial situation.

The owner and operator of businessfinancenews.com is not a lender and is not involved into making credit decisions associated with lending or making loan offers. Instead, the website is designed only for a matching service, which enables the users contact with the lenders and third parties. The website does not charge any fees for its service, nor does it oblige any user to initiate contact with any of the lenders or third parties or accept any loan product or service offered by the lenders. All the data concerning personal loan products and the industry is presented on the website for information purposes only.

Businessfinancenews.com does not endorse any particular lender, nor does it represent or is responsible for the actions or inactions of the lenders. Businessfinancenews.com does not collect, store or has access to the information regarding the fees and charges associated with the contacting lenders and/or any loan products. Online personal loans are not available in all the states. Not all the lenders in the network can provide the loans up to $3,000. Businessfinancenews.com cannot guarantee that the user of the website will be approved by any lender or for any loan product, will be matched with a lender, or if matched, will receive a personal loan offer on the terms requested in the online form. The lenders may need to perform credit check via one or more credit bureaus, including but not limited to major credit bureaus in order to determine credit reliability and the scopes of credit products to offer. The lenders in the network may need to perform additional verifications, including but not limited to social security number, driver license number, national ID or other identification documents. The terms and scopes of loan products vary from lender to lender and can depend on numerous factors, including but not limited to the state of residence and credit standing of the applicant, as well as the terms determined by each lender individually. 

APR REPRESENTATIVE

APR (Annual Percentage Rate) is the loan rate calculated for the annual term. Since businessfinancenews.com is not a lender and has no information regarding the terms and other details of personal loan products offered by lenders individually, businessfinancenews.com cannot provide the exact APR charged for any loan product offered by the lenders. The APRs greatly vary from lender to lender, state to state and depend on numerous factors, including but not limited to the credit standing of an applicant. Additional charges associated with the loan offer, including but not limited to origination fees, late payment, non-payment charges and penalties, as well as non-financial actions, such as late payment reporting and debt collection actions, may be applied by the lenders. These financial and non-financial actions have nothing to do with businessfinancenews.com, and businessfinancenews.com has no information regaining whatsoever actions may be taken by the lenders. All the financial and non-financial charges and actions are to be disclosed in any particular loan agreement in a clear and transparent manner. The APR is calculated as the annual charge and is not a financial charge for a personal loan product. 

Late Payment Implications

It is highly recommended to contact the lender if late payment is expected or considered possible. In this case, late payment fees and charges may be implied. Federal and state regulations are determined for the cases of late payment and may vary from case to case. All the details concerning the procedures and costs associated with late payment are disclosed in loan agreement and should be reviewed prior to signing any related document. 

Non-payment Implications

Financial and non-financial penalties may be implied in cases of non-payment or missed payment. Fees and other financial charges for late payment are to be disclosed in loan agreement. Additional actions related to non-payment, such as renewals, may be implied upon given consent. The terms of renewal are to be disclosed in each loan agreement individually. Additional charges and fees associated with renewal may be applied. 

Debt collection practices and other related procedures may be performed. All the actions related to these practices are adjusted to Fair Debt Collection Practices Act regulations and other applicable federal and state laws in order to protect consumers from unfair lending and negative borrowing experience. The majority of lenders do not refer to outside collection agencies and attempt to collect the debt via in-house means. 

Non-payment and late payment may have negative impact on the borrowers’ credit standing and downgrade their credit scores, as the lenders may report delinquency to credit bureaus, including but not limited to Equifax, Transunion, and Experian. In this case the results of non-payment and late payment may be recorded and remain in credit reports for the determined amount of time.