how to increase the ph in a hot tub

Ensuring that your hot tub water is balanced is one of the important tasks that must be done. So, how do you increase the pH in a spa?

To increase the pH in a spa, add 1 tablespoon of pH increaser, baking soda, or soda ash, for every 100 gallons of water. Most large hot tubs will be 600 gallons. Turn on all jets and water features as they naturally increase the pH also. Test again and adjust if needed, in 20 minutes.

In the article, we’ll go into what happens if the hot tub pH is too low and baking, whether high pH is dangerous, and other pertinent themes.

Let’s get going.

Ready to Spend Less Time On Maintenance and More Time Enjoying Your Hot Tub?

Let’s face it. Balancing the water, cleaning filters, dealing with rashes, and trying to figure out which chemicals to buy and add can make you feel more like a chemist than someone who just wants to relax after a long hard day!

That’s exactly why The Hot Tub Handbook and Video Course is so valuable!

This is from Matt over at Swim University and he developed it for people looking to save money, time, and frustration. His tips on chemicals can save you $100/year just by making sure you buy only what you need.

So if you’re ready to stop being confused or frustrated with your hot tub and start spending more time in it, check out The Hot Tub Handbook and Video Course.

Just click that link to learn more on their website.

I wonder what the PH is in the trucker hot tub? Pretty basic I think.#Clownvoy pic.twitter.com/eK6X4NZbJi

— Mike in the middle (@Mikenthemiddle) February 13, 2022

What happens if the hot tub pH is too low?

If a hot tub pH is too low, the water is acidic. This can lead to the corrosion of equipment and surfaces. It also makes it difficult to adjust the alkalinity. Acidic water is uncomfortable because it irritates the eyes and removes natural oils from the skin, rendering it dry and itchy.

It can also cause the breakdown of swimwear and hot tub accessories.

Low pH may also lead to rapid dissipation of chlorine, requiring that you use more. What are the causes and remedies?

The water in your area may be naturally more acidic, or perhaps your hot tub is often uncovered, and rainwater has fallen into it.

The water may also have become imbalanced because of improper use of sanitizers and other hot tub chemicals. If you use too much chlorine, it could decrease the hot tub’s pH and make the water more acidic.

The following are methods for raising the pH of your hot tub:

  • Use Soda Ash (Sodium Carbonate)
  • Spa-Up type products (Sodium Bicarbonate)
  • Use Baking Soda (Sodium Bicarbonate)

I’ll get into baking soda below. But my favorite product for raising the pH in a hot tub is Leisure Time Spa Up on Amazon. Just click that link to check the current price on Amazon.

Woo Hoo Today is Bubble Bath Day: A good day to soak in a hot tub! What is your go to for a perfect bath? I prefer no bubbles…2 cups of Epson salts, 1/2 cup baking soda, tablespoon of almond oil and 5 drops of lavender E.O. I’m dreaming of a good soak~Sabrina pic.twitter.com/WZW7TdCU7e

— New Mix 100.7 (@NewMix1007) January 9, 2019

Will baking soda increase the pH in a Spa?

Yes. Baking soda increases the pH in a Spa. However, an excessive amount of it is required to impact the pH significantly. Therefore, it is best to explore alternatives, which can be used in a much lower quantity.

So, baking soda will only raise the pH slightly.

It is more effective when you want to raise the alkalinity of the water. Raising the pH of the water must be done properly so that you stay within the right range, this is because if the pH is too high, it could adversely affect the equipment.

In a recent article, I offered an in-depth exploration of whether you could use baking soda to raise the pH in your hot tub.

I got into whether baking soda is the best way to raise the pH of your hot tub and how much baking soda you need to increase the hot tub’s pH.

It’s all about #balance— pH balance, acidity, and alkalinity in the latest #PaddleHealthy: http://t.co/oBTdlHPm0h pic.twitter.com/VnSy4iVa54

— SUP Magazine (@SUPthemag) May 20, 2014

How do I raise the pH in my hot tub without raising alkalinity?

It is impossible to raise the pH in your hot tub without raising alkalinity at least a little. However, since the safe zone for both is a range, it is possible to get both in the proper range.

Adjusting the pH a little low and then using the jets to raise it is one way.

Jets will always raise the pH a little without affecting alkalinity. Alkalinity is a measure of water’s buffering capacity — its ability to resist sudden changes in pH. Therefore, both are related, and a change in one impacts the other.

To further understand why it’s impossible to change one without altering the other. Let’s learn more about pH and alkalinity (often referred to as total alkalinity).

pH measures the concentration of acid protons in water.

By comparison, alkalinity is a measure of the ability of water to neutralize or buffer acids. So, alkalinity levels impact water’s ability to maintain pH levels.

When you use the jets, the pH of the water is raised a little. And when it does, seeing as the water is being aerated.

Before you use a pH Increaser, it’s best to know the recommended levels for both pH and alkalinity. pH should be between 7.2 and 7.8, with 7.4 and 7.6 being ideal, while alkalinity should fall between 20 and 120 ppm (parts per million).

Add one tablespoon of pH increaser for every 100 gallons of water your hot tub holds. This will also increase total alkalinity by 20ppm. Assuming your hot tub holds 400 gallons, you’ll add 4 tablespoons of pH Increaser.

Check out a recent article I published. In it, I offered a lot more info on the difference between pH and alkalinity in a hot tub or a pool.

I revealed whether pH increaser is the same as alkalinity increaser and how to raise the pH in your pool but not its alkalinity. But I also shared which one is more important: pH or alkalinity?

Just click the link to read it on my site.

It deleted my whole thread when I tried to delete and retype the last tweet..

Anyway, Summer pro-tip:

If you don’t have a pool/hot tub/access. Make your own.

This is my 110 gallon stock tank made of hard black plastic. They are extremely durable and come in various sizes pic.twitter.com/WicNnOEYRq

— Shannon in Ohio 4 (@ShannonFreshour) June 12, 2021

How do I raise my pH in my hot tub without chemicals?

You can use regular baking soda to raise the pH of your hot tub without using chemicals. But simply turning on all jets and water features will raise the pH slightly.

You will need water test strips, measuring spoons, and of course, baking soda.

That being said, many spa-up-type products are also sodium bicarbonate which is exactly the same as baking soda; they just may be more concentrated.

Here’s what to do using baking soda:

  1. Estimate the number of gallons in the hot tub.
  2. Check the pH level using a test strip.
  3. Add one tablespoon of baking soda for every 100 gallons the hot tub holds (say it holds 300 gallons, add 3 tablespoons of baking soda).
  4. Now, turn on the jets and allow the water to circulate for 2 to 4 hours.
  5. Re-test the pH level. If it is still below the recommended range, add more baking soda.
  6. Alternate between circulating the water and adding more baking soda until it’s within the recommended range of 7.2 to 7.8.

Not sure how to estimate the gallons in your hot tub?

I have an easy way to do it that I outlined in this recent article. Just click that link to read it right here.

#IAmCursedWith Never having right hot tub ph or chlorine levels 👎🏼📊 pic.twitter.com/nzy6fZUiYd

— SW CO SpaceX Dragon (@droCO_dragon) October 1, 2018

Is high pH in a hot tub dangerous?

Yes. High pH in a hot tub is dangerous. It could lead to cloudy water, and bathers could experience burning eyes and itchy skin. It could also lead to scale buildup, adversely affecting the hot tub plumbing and equipment over time.

A high pH is a bad thing in a hot tub. But how do you know when it is high? If test strips indicate that it is above 7.8. It is high.

We all know people with extremely sensitive skin. They would probably be the first to detect that there is something off with the water because it would be very uncomfortable for them.

There may be a strong chlorine smell, and algae growth is facilitated.

And the water may become cloudy or dull. High pH also impacts the effectiveness of chlorine. Even when tests show that you have chlorine in the water, the chemical could not do its job as well as it should.

And that comes with a host of problems in itself. 

The most important is the effect on the health of the hot tub users, as it would be host to contaminants that could harm them.

The buildup of scale that I mentioned earlier can become severe over time. It could gradually build up in the pipes and equipment such that you can even see chalky flakes when the jets are turned on. In time, the buildup could restrict water flow!

In addition to slowing down the pressure in the jets, it could even cause the heater and the pump to fail prematurely. So, it’s not something to be taken lightly.

But can you still go ahead and use a hot tub when the pH is high?

Check out a recent article where I explained what happens when a hot tub’s pH is high and what exactly pH is as it relates to hot tubs. I also revealed why your hot tub pH is always high.

Just click the link to read it on my site.

Conclusion

In the article, we looked at what happens if the hot tub pH is too high and if baking soda can be used to increase hot tub pH when it is low.

Then, we considered how to raise pH without also raising alkalinity. We also looked at how to raise pH without chemicals.

Lastly, we wrapped things up by determining if high pH is dangerous.

Ready to Spend Less Time On Maintenance and More Time Enjoying Your Hot Tub?

Let’s face it. Balancing the water, cleaning filters, dealing with rashes, and trying to figure out which chemicals to buy and add can make you feel more like a chemist than someone who just wants to relax after a long hard day!

That’s exactly why The Hot Tub Handbook and Video Course is so valuable!

This is from Matt over at Swim University and he developed it for people looking to save money, time, and frustration. His tips on chemicals can save you $100/year just by making sure you buy only what you need.

So if you’re ready to stop being confused or frustrated with your hot tub and start spending more time in it, check out The Hot Tub Handbook and Video Course.

Just click that link to learn more on their website.


Photo by olia danilevich from Pexels and Image by Clker-Free-Vector-Images from Pixabay

Photo of author

Author S Krone

A lawyer never retires. So I would just say that I am not as active as I used to be. Now I simply dedicate myself to fishing, my hobby, and my grandchildren. For Business Finance News I write about legal aspects of mortgage policies, mostly regarding the rights of policyholders. I also have articles about personal injuries.

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