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how long do hot tubs take to heat up

If you’re planning on buying a hot tub and wondering how long it will take to heat up, then you’ve come to the right place. Of course, when you come home from a rough day, the first thing you’ll probably want to do is dig into that sweet, hot water. When used optimally, a hot tub typically sits around 100 to 102 degrees Fahrenheit.

The main question is, how long does it take to get there?

Come with us as we explore the answer to that question.

How Long Does It Take To Heat A Hot Tub

If you’re looking to heat your hot tub up to 100 to 102 degrees Fahrenheit, then you’ll probably end up waiting at least three hours for it to get there. However, it depends on several factors, including the design of the hot tub, the age of the hot tub, and the temperature outside. It may take up to eight hours or more in some cases.

You can typically expect water in your hot tub to heat up anywhere from 5 to 10 degrees every hour.

The good thing is, if you don’t want to wait three hours on average every time that you try to heat up your hot tub, there are plenty of things you can do to speed up the process. If you are a hot tub owner and you’re looking to get your hot tub running at an optimal temperature much faster, then follow these next tips.

How To Heat Up Your Hot Tub Faster

Base Hot Tub Temperature

The temperature that you start with is going to determine how long it takes your hot tub to heat up.

Of course, you can keep your hot tub running at all times, though you should consider a few things before doing so.

For starters, if you’re someone who resides in a warmer or temperate climate, you might choose to shut your hot tub down when it’s not in use. If you don’t use your hot tub very often, the same thing applies. In this case, your hot tub will take much longer to get to its optimal heat.

On the other hand, you might choose to keep your hot tub on at all times. Yes, you will have much higher electricity bills in this case, though you’ll be able to get to that optimal heat range must faster.

Air Temperature

The temperature of the air also has a big impact on how long it takes to heat a hot tub. If the air surrounding the hot tub is warm, then the heating process won’t take as long. However, if you’re dealing with cold air, then the water temperature may require several hours to heat.

Of course, you can’t simply control the weather around you. However, there are a few things you can do to maintain warm water in cold weather. One of the most important things is keeping your hot tub out of the way of wind chill.

Depending on the location of your hot tub, you might end up getting a lot of wind. If your hot tub is in the path of wind, consider changing its location or covering it up.

You might consider setting up a fence surrounding your hot tub or plant some shrubs that can act as a natural cover.

Speaking of covers…

Hot Tub Covers

If you don’t have a cover for your hot tub, you need to get one. A cover can help trap the heat in the water, lessening the time it takes for you to heat the water. Without a cover, the water can evaporate, making you wait much longer for your hot tub to reach optimal heat.

Having hot water is all about energy efficiency. If your cover isn’t energy-efficient and made of quality materials, you will have a hard time heating up your hot tub quickly.

Make sure to inspect your cover every now and then for tears, holes, cracks, or water damage. If you see that your spa cover is suffering from damage, you should consider buying a new one.

Check out our review of one of our favorite places to buy covers for spas below:

The Cover Guy Reviews

Spa Insulation

Newer, more well-insulated spa models are better at holding heat. Plus, they are far more energy-efficient compared to older spa models. Beyond the top of your spa, heat can also escape through microscopic cracks in the cabinet of your spa.

You might be surprised to hear that a fair amount of heat can escape through the base of your spa, which is why many people end up buying special heat-trapping pads to keep the water warmer for longer while decreasing the overall heating time.

Maintaining Your Spa

While maintenance isn’t the most exciting thing to think about, it can play a pretty big role in how much time it will take your hot tub to reach optimal heat. Beyond that, you should consider the components of your hot tub and what kind of condition they are in.

Some of the ways in which your hot tub will heat faster are if the filters are clean and clear, the jets are operating correctly, and the tub’s pumps are running nicely.

Make sure to set up a maintenance routine for your spa so that it is always in the best condition.

The Jets

There are many hot tub owners that say the water stays hotter when the jets are running in the spa, as it helps circulate the water creating heating efficiency. On the other hand, there are people who believe that having the jets on spits cool bubbles into the rest of the water, increasing the time it takes for the hot tub to get heated.;

We recommend keeping your jets on periodically when you have your heater on. It is best to run them close to the end of the heat process so that you can circulate warm bubbles instead of cool bubbles.

Heater Quality

Cheaper spas tend to have cheaper heaters. Spas that are old tend to wear down on their heaters, just as they do with the other components. If you have an older spa, the good thing is, you can always upgrade your heating components. In doing so, you can reduce the hot tub’s heat-up time.

Learn more about different heating element types at our blog below:

Natural Gas Hot Tub Vs. Electric

Bottom Line

As you can see, there is a process for increasing the overall efficiency of your hot tub if you want to use it sooner than later. Now that you know how long it takes to heat up a hot tub, you can take the necessary steps to get it heated faster.

Make sure to block out any wind chill, get a high-quality hot tub cover, create a maintenance routine to keep your hot tub’s components in working order, and consider upgrading your heating element if it is old or not working very well.

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Author S Krone

A lawyer never retires. So I would just say that I am not as active as I used to be. Now I simply dedicate myself to fishing, my hobby, and my grandchildren. For Business Finance News I write about legal aspects of mortgage policies, mostly regarding the rights of policyholders. I also have articles about personal injuries.

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